Egypt clashes continue after Morsi’s ‘emergency’ announcement (PHOTOS)

6588mursi fire 2013 president Egypt clashes continue after Morsi’s ‘emergency’ announcement (PHOTOS)

Egypt clashes continue after Morsi’s ‘emergency’ announcement (PHOTOS)Get short URLLink copied to clipboardemail story to a friendprint versionPublished: 28 January, 2013, 14:42

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Protesters against Egypt’s President Mohamed Mursi stand in front of fire during clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo January 27, 2013 (Reuters / Mohamed Abd El Ghany)Police tear-gassed protesters Cairo on Monday as clashes still gripped Egypt despite a state of emergency being declared. Some 50 people have died in five days of unrest, and there are reports of yet another death and sexual assault in the capital.­”I promised not to take extraordinary measures unless I was forced to, and here I am doing so,” President Morsi said in his televised address on Sunday evening. “I instructed Interior Ministry officials to strictly deal with whoever threatens people and public and private institutions.” The president also called for a meeting with senior politicians and groups. Egypt’s main opposition later arranged to meet with Morsi on Monday, according to a member of the National Salvation Front.However, Cairo-based journalist Bel Trew told RT that there “have already been calls for protests to break this curfew starting at 8pm [Monday night], they say, in defiance of the president.””Security forces are now able to arrest citizens and detain them for up to 30 days without charges. So we’re likely to see a wave of arrests across those three cities as people violate the curfew and clash with police,” she said.”Opposition, coalition, and National Salvation Front are still maintaining a stance against the president. They are demanding that the cabinet resign, the constitution be revoked, and a national salvation government take over…it is unlikely that they will actually have dialogues with the president at this point.”Despite this, Trew told RT that some have welcomed the move as Morsi had been criticized for sitting on the fence.Shortly after the state of emergency was declared, some 200 people marched in the streets of Ismailia, Reuters reported citing witnesses. “Down with Morsi, down with the state of emergency,” they chanted.An image grab taken from a TV channel shows Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi as he gives an address on January 27, 2013 in Cairo (AFP Photo)­Amid the unrest, there have been reports of men groping and assaulting isolated women in Tahrir Square. Some women have been stripped naked and one was raped, local women’s rights campaigners told the Guardian. ­Rallies have been taking place in Cairo, Alexandria, Suez and half a dozen other places. Many of the actions have become violent. Protesters have taken to the streets in greater numbers following Saturday’s death sentence verdicts over a stadium stampede last February.On Sunday, thousands turned out for the funerals of 35 rioters who were killed in previous Port Said protests on Saturday. Teargas was fired in the vicinity and gunfire was heard nearby. In Cairo, there was so much teargas in the air that Trew was struggling to get her words out.”);
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­Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi declared a 30-day state of emergency in Egypt starting Monday evening after ongoing clashes and protests led to multiple deaths and left hundreds injured. Morsi also set curfews from 9pm to 6am in the three most volatile cities of Port Said, Suez and Ismailia. Further unrest is anticipated as many plan to violate the restrictions. But the violent unrest has continued, leading many to believe a curfew will also be imposed on the capital. Police again fired teargas at rock-throwing protesters in Tahrir Square and one person was killed in clashes near the iconic venue, AFP reported Monday morning.Protesters against Egypt’s President Mohamed Mursi throw a tear gas canister fired by riot police into the Nile during clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo January 27, 2013 (Reuters / Mohamed Abd El Ghany)­”I promised not to take extraordinary measures unless I was forced to, and here I am doing so,” President Morsi said in his televised address on Sunday evening. “I instructed Interior Ministry officials to strictly deal with whoever threatens people and public and private institutions.” The president also called for a meeting with senior politicians and groups. Egypt’s main opposition later arranged to meet with Morsi on Monday, according to a member of the National Salvation Front.However, Cairo-based journalist Bel Trew told RT that there “have already been calls for protests to break this curfew starting at 8pm [Monday night], they say, in defiance of the president.””Security forces are now able to arrest citizens and detain them for up to 30 days without charges. So we’re likely to see a wave of arrests across those three cities as people violate the curfew and clash with police,” she said.”Opposition, coalition, and National Salvation Front are still maintaining a stance against the president. They are demanding that the cabinet resign, the constit
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ution be revoked, and a national salvation government take over…it is unlikely that they will actually have dialogues with the president at this point.”Despite this, Trew told RT that some have welcomed the move as Morsi had been criticized for sitting on the fence.Shortly after the state of emergency was declared, some 200 people marched in the streets of Ismailia, Reuters reported citing witnesses. “Down with Morsi, down with the state of emergency,” they chanted.An image grab taken from a TV channel shows Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi as he gives an address on January 27, 2013 in Cairo (AFP Photo)­Amid the unrest, there have been reports of men groping and assaulting isolated women in Tahrir Square. Some women have been stripped naked and one was raped, local women’s rights campaigners told the Guardian. ­Rallies have been taking place in Cairo, Alexandria, Suez and half a dozen other places. Many of the actions have become violent. Protesters have taken to the streets in greater numbers following Saturday’s death sentence verdicts over a stadium stampede last February.On Sunday, thousands turned out for the funerals of 35 rioters who were killed in previous Port Said protests on Saturday. Teargas was fired in the vicinity and gunfire was heard nearby. In Cairo, there was so much teargas in the air that Trew was struggling to get her words out.

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Egypt clashes continue after Morsi’s ‘emergency’ announcement (PHOTOS)

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