Pakistani PM out to convince protesters to bury bombing victims (PHOTOS)

1a09quetta muslims demonstrate recent Pakistani PM out to convince protesters to bury bombing victims (PHOTOS)

Pakistani PM out to convince protesters to bury bombing victims (PHOTOS)Get short URLLink copied to clipboardemail story to a friendprint versionPublished: 13 January, 2013, 16:46

TAGS:Protest,
Politics,
Terrorism,
Security,
Pakistan

Pakistani Shiite Muslims demonstrate against recent bombings in Quetta.(AFP Photo / Banaras Khan)Pakistani ministers are trying to calm a thousand-strong protest in the city of Quetta, where grieving relatives of the victims of anti-Shiite bombings are refusing to bury their loved ones until they can feel safe from terrorists.­The leaders of the community demand that the provincial government be dismissed and that the army be deployed in Quetta to guarantee their safety. They also want the people behind the bombings to be brought to justice.As the protest continues, a new bombing attack in the city killed a six-year-old boy, when an explosive device went off on Saturday night outside of an internet café. Pakistani Shiite Muslims shout slogans against the twin bombings attack in Quetta, at a rally in Karachi.(AFP Photo / Asif Hassan)The militant Sunni group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi claimed responsibility for the twin blasts at the billiard hall, which killed patrons and later those who rushed for rescue after the first explosion was set off. A total of 125 people died in those blasts and two others that happened in Quetta on Thursday.Pakistani Shiite Muslims offer prayers as they gather against the bomb attack in Quetta, at a rally in Lahore.(AFP Photo / Arif Ali)­The Hazara are an ethnic group including more than 5 million people, mostly living in neighboring Afghanistan. But over the decades of persecution many of them moved to other places, with major communities living in Iran, Pakistan and Europe.They have been living in Pakistan since the 19th century, with most settling in Quetta. Hazara are the largest group of Shiites living in the predominantly Sunni province and many of the victims of sectarian violence there targeting Shiites are Hazara.Lashkar-e-Jhangvi is determined to expel Hazara along with other Shiites from Pakistan.Pakistani Shiite Muslims gather against the twin bombings attack in Quetta, at a rally in Lahore.(AFP Photo / Arif Ali)Pakistani Shiite Muslims demonstrate and sit between the coffins of bomb blast victims in Quetta.(AFP Photo / Banaras Khan)Journalists from the Balochistan Union Of Journalists hold a photograph of their colleague Imran Sheikh, who was killed in an explosion the day before, during a silent sit-in to protest against bomb blasts and condemn the killings of members of the media, outside the press club in Quetta.(Reuters / Naseer Ahmed)Supporters of the Imamia Students Organisation (ISO) and the Majlis-e-
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Wahdat-e-Muslimeen (MWM) religious group attend a protest against the bomb blasts in Quetta a day earlier, in Lahore.(Reuters / Mani Rana)”);
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Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf heads the cabinet delegation that flew to the capital of the southwestern province of Balochistan on Sunday. The visit comes after thousands of protesters who are holding vigils at the site of the deadliest of Thursday bombing refused to talk with a delegation led by the minister for religious affairs, who arrived Saturday.The protesters come from the community of the Hazara people and other Shiites, who were the prime target of the bombings at a local billiard hall. They are taking part in a sit-in beside the shrouded bodies of 96 people, who were killed by the terrorist attack.Muslim tradition requires that a funeral takes place as quickly after the death as possible. Protesters’ willingness to go against it and keep their perished family and friends unburied for more than two days after their deaths shows the degree of their anxiety.Pakistani Shiite Muslims demonstrate as they sit between the coffins of bombing victims in Quetta.(AFP Photo / Banaras Khan)­The leaders of the community demand that the provincial government be dismissed and that the army be deployed in Quetta to guarantee their safety. They also want the people behind the bombings to be brought to justice.As the protest continues, a new bombing attack in the city killed a six-year-old boy, when an explosive device went off on Saturday night outside of an internet café. Pakistani Shiite Muslims shout slogans against the twin bombings attack in Quetta, at a rally in Karachi.(AFP Photo / Asif Hassan)The militant Sunni group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi claimed responsibility for the twin blasts at the billiard hall, which killed patrons and later those who rushed for rescue after the first explosion was set off. A total of 125 people died in those blasts and two others that happened in Quetta on Thursday.Pakistani Shiite Muslims offer prayers as they gather against the bomb attack in Quetta, at a rally in Lahore.(AFP Photo / Arif Ali)­The Hazara are an ethnic group including more than 5 million people, mostly living in neighboring Afghanistan. But over the decades of persecution many of them moved to other places, with major communities living in Iran, Pakistan and Europe.They have been living in Pakistan since the 19th century, with most settling in Quetta. Hazara are the largest group of Shiites living in the predominantly Sunni province and many of the victims of sectarian violence there targeting Shiites are Hazara.Lashkar-e-Jhangvi is determined to exp
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el Hazara along with other Shiites from Pakistan.Pakistani Shiite Muslims gather against the twin bombings attack in Quetta, at a rally in Lahore.(AFP Photo / Arif Ali)Pakistani Shiite Muslims demonstrate and sit between the coffins of bomb blast victims in Quetta.(AFP Photo / Banaras Khan)Journalists from the Balochistan Union Of Journalists hold a photograph of their colleague Imran Sheikh, who was killed in an explosion the day before, during a silent sit-in to protest against bomb blasts and condemn the killings of members of the media, outside the press club in Quetta.(Reuters / Naseer Ahmed)Supporters of the Imamia Students Organisation (ISO) and the Majlis-e-Wahdat-e-Muslimeen (MWM) religious group attend a protest against the bomb blasts in Quetta a day earlier, in Lahore.(Reuters / Mani Rana)

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Pakistani PM out to convince protesters to bury bombing victims (PHOTOS)

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