Tumor In 1,600-Year-Old Roman Corpse Found To Contain Teeth, Bone

By: Owen Jarus, LiveScience Contributor Published: 01/22/2013 07:00 AM EST on LiveScience In a necropolis in Spain, archaeologists have found the remains of a Roman woman who died in her 30s with a calcified tumor in her pelvis, a bone and four deformed teeth embedded within it. Two of the teeth are still attached to the wall of the tumor researchers say. The woman, who died some 1,600 years ago, had a condition known today as an ovarian teratoma which, as its name indicates, occurs in the ovaries . The word Teratoma comes from the Greek words "teras" and "onkoma" which translate to "monster" and "swelling," respectively. The tumor is about 1.7 inches (44 millimeters) in diameter at its largest point. "Ovarian teratomas are bizarre, but benign tumors," writes lead researcher Núria Armentano, of the ANTROPÒLEGS.LAB company and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, in an email to LiveScience. The tumors come from germ cells, which form human eggs and can create hair, teeth and bone, among other structures. [See Images of Bizarre Tumor & Remains] This is the first time scientists have found this type of teratoma in the ancient world.
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Tumor In 1,600-Year-Old Roman Corpse Found To Contain Teeth, Bone

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